About us   Editorial Board   Advisory Board   Subscribe   Contact us  
 


VOL. 3 (4) - AUTUMN 2009              Download Full Issue

Note from the Editor-in-Chief (331-332)
 

Research Papers

Alternative Dispute Resolution in the North Caucasus (pp. 333-341)
by Renée Gendron

The Implications of the 1993 U.N. Security Council Action for the Settlement of the Armenia-Azerbaijan Conflict (pp. 342-370)
by Rovshan Sadigbayli

Political Economy of Old-Age Pension Reforms in Georgia (pp. 371-386)
by Alexi Gugushvili

Corruption in Russia: A Model Exploring its Economic Costs (pp. 387-403)
by Michael P. Barry

Experiments in Soft Balancing: China- led Multilateralism in Africa and the Arab World (pp. 404-434)
by Nicola P. Contessi
 

Comment

 

Between NATO & Russia: Ukraine’s Foreign Policy Crossroads Revisited (pp. 435-444)
by Mykola Kapitonenko
 

Book Review

“An Endless War: The Russian-Chechen Conflict in Perspective” by Emil Souleimanov (pp. 445-446)
Review by Martin Malek
 

Interview

“Armenia & Georgia: Corruption, the State, and Change” (pp. 447-451)
Interview with Dr. Christoph H. Stefes, University of Colorado Denver, US

“If Turkish-Armenian Border Reopens, Georgia Will Become Less Important” (pp. 452-455)
Interview with Dr. Hans Gutbrod and Koba Turmanidze, Caucasus Research Resource Centers, Tbilisi, Georgia

 

 

 

Note From The Editor-In-Chief (p. 331-332)

With the signing of the protocols between Armenia and Turkey in Geneva, the world waits on the two countries’ parliaments to ratify these accords and open the border—a move that could have various implications for the region and beyond. Being part of Turkey’s zero-problems policy, normalizing relations with Armenia is another step toward resolving regional problems with its immediate neighbors—measures which may prove to be too impressive for Brussels to ignore. On the other hand, resolving problems with immediate neighbors may come at the expense of creating new ones with long-time allies. Cue Azerbaijan, which also plays a large role in this process, demands a substantial progress in Nagorno-Karabakh, including the phased withdrawal of Armenian troops, before opening of the Turkish-Armenian borderread more

 

 

Research Papers

Alternative Dispute Resolution in the North Caucasus (pp. 333-341)
by Renée Gendron

This article argues that clan conflicts can be addressed through the extension of existing alternative dispute resolution mechanisms. Clan disputes and conflicts are interdependent of other violent conflicts. Through the expansion of existing informal justice mechanisms, the republics of the North Caucasus as well as the Russian Federation can improve the rule of law and reduce the incidents of violence. Recognizing and utilizing local indigenous conflict resolution mechanisms will also empower those populations, facilitating greater active participation in societyread more

 

The Implications of the 1993 U.N. Security Council Action for the Settlement of the Armenia-Azerbaijan Conflict (pp. 342-370)
by Rovshan Sadigbayli

 

The article revisits the four resolutions adopted in 1993 by the U.N. Security Council on the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan. It analyses the terminology used in these resolutions viewed within the overall context, in which these resolutions were adopted. It is the premise of this article that these resolutions were the result of the complex web of interrelated factors, which had a decisive impact on the Security Council actions in relation to the conflict. These resolutions reflect the delicate balance between the obligation of the U.N. Security Council to abide by the principles and norms of international law enshrined in the U.N. Charter and address situations threatening international peace and security in an unbiased way and on the other hand safeguarding the interests of the permanent members of the Councilread more
 

Political Economy of Old-Age Pension Reforms in Georgia (pp. 371-386)
by Alexi Gugushvili

The paper examines the factors that played a major role in development of the old-age pension system in Georgia. Based on data collected from 1991–2009, this analysis centers on the system’s patterns of development and identifies four main attempts to reform the old-age pension system. Economic performance, demographic aging, domestic political constellations, and external influence are traditionally thought to be responsible for the pension system reforms. Qualitative data analyses and in-depth interviews have been used to test these explanations. This analysis did not confirm the hypotheses, but it revealed that fiscal constraints and international technical assistance were the main factors behind reforms during the first two chronological attempts to change the system. Political factors and liberal economic ideology influenced the patterns of old-age pension policy development from 2004–2008, while the negative outcomes of the Russian-Georgian War and World Financial Crisis are currently the major obstacles for comprehensive pension reforms. The limitations of this study suggest that in order to clarify the exact nature of old-age pension system, shorter time periods and separate reform initiatives should be investigatedread more

 

Corruption in Russia: A Model Exploring its Economic Costs (pp. 387-403)
by Michael P. Barry

The Russian Federation is one of 116 countries which have ratified the United Nations Convention Against Corruption, a document which sets a tone and specific provisions aimed at reducing bribery in the public and private sector, unjust enrichment of officials, embezzlement, and other forms of corruption. However, based on survey data, government reports, and the writings of international organizations, Russia has not been successful in enforcing the provisions of the UNCAC.  This paper will develop a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model to quantify the macroeconomic effects of corruption in Russia. Corruption is found to cost the Russian economy billions of dollars a year.  A conclusion of the paper is that implementing and enforcing the UNCAC would be of significant economic benefit to Russia and its peopleread more

 

Experiments in Soft Balancing: China- led Multilateralism in Africa and the Arab World (pp. 404-434)
by Nicola P. Contessi

Multilateralism is a key feature associated with China’s rise both at the global and regional level, particularly in South East and Central Asia. Consistently, China has opted for multilateralism to manage cooperation with African and Arab countries, establishing the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation, and the Sino-Arab Cooperation Forum. Multilateralism has also been described as China’s chosen balancing tool in the post-2001 world. If the role of multilateralism can be inferred from an examination of the principled meanings it embodies, my paper investigates how the said structures might allow such form of balancingread more

 

Comment

Between NATO & Russia: Ukraine’s Foreign Policy Crossroads Revisited (pp. 435-444)
by Mykola Kapitonenko
 

A strategic choice between NATO membership and closer cooperation with Russia is at the heart of Ukrainian foreign policy. Locked within this dilemma, Ukraine often misses out other important foreign policy variables. Most importantly, the framework for strategic choice is shifting, with potential risks and benefits changing significantly. Moreover, Ukrainian decision-makers often believe that the right choice between East and West will be enough to settle Ukrainian security. This article puts forward the hypothesis that the context of this choice is more important, namely, that structural factors and additional regional arrangements are crucial to both national and regional securityread more

 

Book Review

“An Endless War: The Russian-Chechen Conflict in Perspective” by Emil Souleimanov (pp. 445-446)
Review by Martin Malek

This volume sheds light on the background to the war in the small, autonomous republic of Chechnya – a war that has almost been forgotten by the world’s public but that is still, apart from a hiatus between 1996 and 1999, ongoing. Its roots go back almost two centuries, to when Tsarist Russia thought it necessary to bring “civilisation” to the North Caucasus with fire and swordread more

 

Interview

“Armenia & Georgia: Corruption, the State, and Change” (pp. 447-451)
Interview with Dr. Christoph H. Stefes, University of Colorado Denver, US

CRIA: With regard to your comparative study of corruption in Georgia and Armenia, can you explain its different levels – i.e. where it takes place and in what way – in society? Whom or what does it affect most? Why?

Stefes: Let me first state that my research on corruption in Georgia focused primarily on the Shevardnadze era. I lived, worked, and researched in Georgia from February 1998 until June 1999. From what I could gather, under Georgia’s current president, Mikhail Saak’ashvili, the situation seems to have improved dramatically. Yet we have to keep in mind that Georgia started from an extremely low level of accountability. Under President Shevardnadze, corruption was the rule rather than the exception throughout the entire state apparatus, from the bottom to the top, from a rural police station to the Minister of Interiorread more
 

“If Turkish-Armenian Border Reopens, Georgia Will Become Less Important” (pp. 452-455)
Interview with Dr. Hans Gutbrod and Koba Turmanidze,

Caucasus Research Resource Centers, Tbilisi, Georgia

CRIA: Over the last ten years that you have been living and working in Georgia, what are some changes that strike you the most? 

Gutbrod: I think it would be fair to say that when I came here in 1999, there was trouble in every single way. Georgia and its people were running up against massive and huge challenges. Now, one of the things that have changed, clearly, is that they have narrowed the challenges down. Of course, the country is still facing important, critical challenges, such as, in the view of its own citizens according to our surveys, challenges like territorial integrity, unemployment, poverty, and that even when people have jobs, they are not getting paid very well, and healthcareread more

       
 
  © 2006-2010 CRIA
  All rights reserved

Editorial Board
Advisory Board
Our Authors

Back Issues
Caucasus Update
Current Issue

Contact Us
Subscribe
Join us on Facebook